ACT Series: How to Prepare for the Science Section of the ACT Test

The ACT is important to high school students in Missouri and across the U.S. for several reasons. It is an important factor considered in college admissions and the way scholarships are awarded. It can help students become eligible for the A+ Scholarship. While the level of importance can differ among students based on their plans, it is a tough challenge for everyone their first time. Students take timed tests in multiple subjects, answering questions that can confuse them or make them second guess themselves.

This is the final article of a four-part series on the ACT, describing each of the subject tests and how to prepare for them. We will finish with science.

The basics of the science test

Like the reading portion, the science portion of the test involves reading passages and answering questions about that information. The passages are from academic journals or reports and students will need to provide data from that information. Students have 35 minutes to answer 40 questions.

How do I prepare for the test?

The ACT publishes a test breakdown which describes how much of the test is focused on one topic. In each topic, it is further broken down into certain areas of focus. For science, a majority of this test will focus on either data representation or research summaries. This means it will either ask you for a specific piece of data or to analyze what the passage focused on.

To help students prepare, the ACT also provides old versions of the test online and in print. Ask your counselor if they have copies of old booklets so you can take practice tests and time yourself.

How is the test graded?

The ACT has released its scoring rubric so you know ahead of time what to expect. This is very helpful for students who are aiming for a specific score.

What is your biggest tip for this test?

Study the small details. On graphs, look at the x and y axis and what they are measuring. For tables, look at what information is given and see if you can find a pattern. The test is used to determine if you can answer questions with the details you have been given, not what you already know.

Final thoughts

A common misconception about the science test is it is quizzing you on how much you know. While a general level of knowledge is needed, it is testing your ability to read and understand scientific information. Basically, what you are able to pick up from the information that is given to you in graph or text form. Remember, calculators are not allowed on this portion despite numerical data being involved. You should come to a conclusion, not a calculation. The quicker you can pick up patterns the better you will do.

Read the other parts of the ACT Series

ACT Series: How to Prepare for the Reading Section of the ACT Test

The ACT is important to high school students in Missouri and across the U.S. for several reasons. It is an important factor that is considered in college admissions and how scholarships are awarded. It can help students become eligible for the A+ Scholarship and in some parts of the state it is a requirement to graduate. While the level of importance can differ among students, based on their plans, it is a tough challenge for everyone their first time. Students take timed tests in multiple subjects, answering questions that can confuse them or make them second guess themselves.

To help students prepare for the ACT test, Journey to College has prepared a four-part series of articles discussing each area of the test. This is the third article of the series on the ACT, describing each of the subject tests and how to prepare for them. The reading portion of the test is the subject of this article.

The basics of the reading test

In the reading portion of the test, students read several passages and answer questions about that information. It challenges students to retain information quickly, think critically about the text, and infer additional information based on what they read. Students have 35 minutes to answer 40 questions.

How do I prepare for the test?

a young man laying on a yellow couch reading a book.The ACT publishes a test breakdown, which describes how much of the test is focused on one topic. In each topic, it is further broken down into certain types of questioning. A majority of the reading test will question you about key details from the text, including picking up context clues and coming to conclusions based on the information given.

To help students prepare for the test, the ACT also provides old versions of the test online and in print. Ask your counselor if they have copies of old booklets so you can take practice tests and time yourself.

How is the test graded?

The ACT has released its scoring rubric so you can know ahead of time what to expect. This is very helpful for students who are aiming for a specific score.

What is your biggest tip for this test?

Learn to skim the material. If you spend a minute on every question, you will run out of time before finishing the test. This doesn’t take into account how much time you will spend reading the section. Briefly going over the passage can still give you information about context and conclusions. If a question stumps you, refer back to the reading but do not reread the entire section.

Final thoughts

The reading section will give you the best chance to score high marks because all the information is provided. Some students have a natural affinity for reading quickly and might perform more naturally on this test. However, that doesn’t mean studying won’t help you improve. Learning to skim or looking at the questions first help you get basic information about the passage. Try to budget your time equally between passages so you are not rushing at the end.

 

Read the other parts of the ACT Series

ACT Series: How to Prepare for the Math Section of the ACT Test

The ACT is important to high school students in Missouri and across the U.S. for several reasons. It is an important factor that is considered in college admissions and how scholarships are awarded. It can help students become eligible for the A+ Scholarship and in some parts of the state it is a requirement to graduate. While the level of importance can differ among students, based on their plans, it is a tough challenge for everyone their first time. Students take timed tests in multiple subjects, answering questions that can confuse them or make them second guess themselves.

This is the second article of a four-part series on the ACT test, from Journey to College, describing each of the subject tests and how to prepare for them. In this article, the math section of the test is the subject of discussion.  

The basics of the math test

Of all the subject tests, the math portion is the most straightforward. In an hour, you answer 60 problems. The questions get more difficult as you go, meaning the first question is the easiest and the last question is the most difficult. It mainly covers concepts from algebra and geometry. The last 20 questions pull from more advanced topics, such as trigonometry, pre-calculus, and calculus.

How do I prepare for the test?

The ACT publishes a test breakdown, which describes how much of the test is focused on one topic (modeling, preparing for higher math, etc.). In each topic, it is further broken down into certain types of questioning. For example, about 8-12 percent of the test will cover statistics and probability questions.

To help students prepare for the test, the ACT also provides old versions of the test online and in print. Ask your counselor if they have copies of old booklets so you can take practice tests and time yourself.

How is the test graded?

The ACT has released its scoring rubric so you can know ahead of time what to expect. This is very helpful for students who are aiming for a specific score, such as those aiming to earn the A+ Scholarship. Students who didn’t score proficient or advanced on their Algebra 1 end-of-course exam can substitute an ACT math score to qualify. Depending on your GPA, this score can change. The same is true for students trying to earn scholarships from a university, especially with the superscore option now available.

Final thoughts

The math section of the ACT is meant to demonstrate the depth of your knowledge in the subject. You either know the material or you don’t. And that is OK. Every student will bring a different level of expertise, as well as a different desire, whether you are aiming for top marks and the Bright Flight scholarship, or just trying to make a certain threshold for A+. Remember, preparation is key.

Read the other parts of the ACT Series

ACT Series: How to Prepare for the English Section of the ACT Test

The ACT is important to high school students in Missouri and across the U.S. for several reasons. It is an important factor that is considered in college admissions and how scholarships are awarded. It can help students become eligible for the A+ Scholarship and in some parts of the state is a requirement to graduate. While the level of importance can differ among students, based on their plans, it is a tough challenge for everyone their first time. Students take timed tests in multiple subjects, answering questions that can confuse them or make them second guess themselves.

This is the first article in a four-part series on the ACT, describing each of the subject tests and how to prepare for them. We will being with English.

The basics of the English test

The English test has two main components. There are collections of short readings and accompanying multiple-choice questions about the passages. Individual words or phrases will be underlined and labeled as options for questions. Questions can focus on the small phrases, sections of the passage, or the entire reading as a whole. You are given 45 minutes to answer 75 questions.

How do I prepare for the test?

The ACT publishes a test breakdown, which describes how much of the test is focused on one topic. In each topic, it is further broken down into certain types of questioning. The English portion of the test will question you about conventions of Standard English, including grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure.

To help students prepare for the test, the ACT provides old versions of the test online and in print. Ask your counselor if they have copies of old booklets so you can take practice tests and time yourself.

How is the test graded?

The ACT releases its scoring rubric so you can know ahead of time what to expect. This is very helpful for students who are aiming for a specific score.

Final thoughts

The English section of the ACT is meant to demonstrate the depth of your knowledge of the subject. You either know the material or you don’t. And that is OK. Each student will bring a different level of knowledge as well as a different desire, whether you are aiming for top marks and the Bright Flight scholarship or just trying to make a certain threshold for another scholarship. The key is to find the correct pace. You don’t want to run out of time because you were overanalyzing one of the first sections. Take practice tests to get a rhythm of how the test will go. You’ve got this.

Read the other parts of the ACT Series

How to Take Dual Credit and Dual Enrollment Classes for Free

One way to get a jumpstart for college is to take a dual credit or dual enrollment class. These classes allow students to earn college credit before they have graduated high school. Students can sometimes start college with the first year of college already finished!

Student looking at camera away from computerIf you plan to take a dual credit or dual enrollment class or are already enrolled in one, you probably know you’ll need to pay for the class. That cost is more difficult to cover for some than it is for others, but Missouri Department of Higher Education & Workforce Development (MDHEWD) can help you earn that college credit for free with the Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment (DC/DE) Scholarship.

This scholarship is awarded to students that need help paying tuition and fees for dual credit or dual enrollment classes. To receive that scholarship, you need to be eligible and you need to apply. This article will help you determine if you’re eligible and what you need to do to apply. 

The deadline to apply for a fall 2022 scholarship is Dec. 1, while the deadline to apply for a spring 2023 scholarship is Feb. 1. Applications can still be submitted after Feb. 1 and before April 2, but you could miss out on getting a scholarship if other students have already been awarded the money that is available.

Am I Eligible?

First, you need to know if you are eligible for a scholarship. Let’s go over the financial requirements. If you get free or reduced lunch at school, you are eligible. Also, if your family gets money through a program from the Missouri Department of Social Services (DSS), you are eligible. If you don’t know or aren’t sure, ask your parent or guardian.

Male student with laptop typing somethingIf you live in a foster home or federal subsidized public housing, are a ward of the state, or are homeless, you can qualify for this scholarship. 

Aside from the financial requirements, you must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident or a Missouri resident, enrolled in a dual credit or dual enrollment class through an approved Missouri college or university, and have at least a 2.5 unweighted, cumulative high school GPA.

Before you start, know you’ll need to upload your high school transcript as well as document(s) that prove you are eligible. Your parent or guardian will also need to sign a release form.

How Do I Apply?

If you’ve determined you are eligible for the Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment Scholarship, here is how you apply for it:

  • Create an account on MDHEWD’s Student Portal. The portal is a helpful tool for you to earn more money to pay for college. More information on the portal is available here.
  • Select the Estimate Eligibility link in the menu at the top of the page.
  • Select the academic year from the “Select an academic year” dropdown menu.
  • Click the Apply link in the Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment Scholarship row of the table.

Why You Should Build an Online Portfolio in College

In the modern workforce, almost every job features an online component, either for branding purposes or as a part of their business operations. This is also true during the hiring process. Gone are the days where you can just walk into a company to meet the manager in person and hand-deliver a resume. In an increasingly digitized and automated world, it’s important to stand out. Many hopeful workers are building their own personal online portfolios to do just that, and they’re starting in college.

A bearded man smiling towards the camera showing off his computer with his portfolio on display.While some careers already require workers to curate a portfolio, it‘s something all students looking for internships or about to graduate should consider. A digital portfolio is a perfect addition to your resume, allowing you to show what makes you unique while also controlling your digital narrative. A digital portfolio helps you create the narrative in a positive way. It showcases what you’re capable of and highlights work that you’re the most proud of producing.

Online portfolios aren’t just for creative careers. They can be useful for just about any career field, from teachers to construction workers. A link to your portfolio in your resume allows hiring managers to become familiar with your work easily before an interview. Here are three things to consider while building an online portfolio:

1. Show off your skills

A student in the library working on her computer and taking notes of something.The benefit to a portfolio is that it can be both universal in scope and incredibly specific for an audience. Not every job is going to require the same thing, so your portfolio should highlight all of your skills. Think of your portfolio as an extension of your resume, as well as a trophy case of your best work. Portfolios are great for showing, not telling. Photos, short descriptions, and organized sections are perfect for highlighting the things that show how well you do each skill. Remember to keep it neat, as visual as possible, and easy to navigate for potential employers.

2. Build off your resume and define your narrative

Employers are not looking for descriptions of the previous job you had, they want concrete evidence of what you can contribute. Portfolios can be the perfect exclamation point to your resume by offering several examples of what skills you possess. The best examples of what you can do come from college assignments and even activities that you’ve been involved in. Did you help coordinate an event? Did you participate in a big project? Did you have an assignment that you aced? These papers or projects show off your ability to understand instructions and perform desired tasks, the keys to a great worker. A resume highlights your accomplishments in school, at a job, or internship. Use your portfolio to give better context to those highlights. 

A student working on her computer, building a resume.Portfolios are also a great way to market yourself. A portfolio can help build that narrative by offering extended contact information or access that can show how you operate in the professional world. Copying your LinkedIn URL or a dedicated Instagram page to your work can help show your ability to be professional even when outside of the work environment and linking to your online portfolio from your LinkedIn account will give potential employers further insight into your talents.

3. Be Creative

An online portfolio is meant to help show people who you are and how talented you are. Do not be afraid of making it unique. There are plenty of free online platforms that will assist in creating a website. Even free to use sites can allow for customization to really let your creativity shine. A great resume catches an employer’s eye quickly by showing what makes you unique. Let your portfolio do the same by demonstrating your personality in the professional space. 

A student working on the computer building his portfolio.It’s always important to stand out in a shifting work landscape. The best way to do that is highlighting what makes you successful. Be proud of those accomplishments! They tell the story of who you are as a person and a worker. Employers want to get to know both sides of you.

If you need some examples of what an online portfolio looks like, do some research. A simple online search will show you a variety of portfolios and ways you can create a portfolio that’s as unique as you are. 

Life After College: Three Ways to Prepare for What’s Next

There are many paths to choose from after graduating college, including graduate school, entering the workforce, traveling, or serving your country in some capacity. Similar to high school, the more time you take to prepare for your future, the less difficult those decisions may be. Luckily, your college or university will have plenty of people and resources that can help you find your ideal path after graduation. Here are three major options to choose after college: 

1. Continuing School: Keys for Graduate Education

Many professions, such as law or medicine, will require some graduate coursework before you can even apply for the job. If you chose one of those as your major, you probably already knew those requirements.

The appeal of college as an undergraduate is as broad as possible. For graduate course work, it should be much more specific. When considering a graduate program or school there are plenty of different questions to ask. Does my current school have a the right program for my interests or do I need to attend a different school? Does my program have additional requirements (GRE, LSAT, etc.) that I must complete beforehand? How many students does my program accept? Is there any funding available for me? Do I have to attend classes in person or is there an online track? Addressing these before applying are fundamental to picking the right program. The sole purpose of these programs is to provide more professional experience that can help in your career and increase your earnings. Knowing what works best for you and what works best for your future is an important part of the decision making process.

2. Tools to Pick the Right Career

The two outcomes that colleges value the most are how many people graduate and how many of them are employed after graduation. They place an extremely high value on these and have many resources dedicated to helping students in their next phase of life. As a senior, you should know what’s at your disposal. Here are three resources to consider:

1. Opportunities for Your Major – Every college has a connection with their local area that includes partnerships and research opportunities. They often build good relationships in the community because those who partner with the campus can hire new talent from recent graduates. Therefore, many major programs will have information about offers exclusive to your academic discipline. Get in contact with your department head to see what opportunities they may have available to you.

2. Your Career Center – Every university has a dedicated career center that’s sole purpose is preparing students for gaining employment. This can be limited to resume critiques or more involved like mock interviews and setting up networking opportunities. This is a valuable resource because they keep in contact with alumni who can give information about what it takes to make it into a career field. This helps the career center prepare students for a specific need such as working on a portfolio for an art school or mock interview questions from previous applicants. The more information you give them, the more they can assist you in finding and securing a job opportunity.

3. Attend a Career Fair – The career center will go above and beyond to help you prepare for what to do when you are applying for positions. They will also help with the hardest part, finding the companies that are hiring. Every year, companies will flock to college campuses in search of new talent to recruit either for internships or for job opportunities after graduation. Attending these is an essential step in preparing for the workforce after college. Many companies will stay and do first rounds of interviews based on the resumes that they receive. Keeping that in mind,  you should check for a list of companies that were invited and prepare copies of your resume to hand out. Bigger universities will also have industry specific fairs or online job fairs, so check to see what your campus has to offer.

3. Alternative Forms of Employment: the Choice to Serve

If graduate school or the traditional workforce do not immediately jump out to you, perhaps you are interested in the chance to serve, either through religious organizations, non-profit sectors, or through the government. One of the best and most secure ways to travel internationally is through service like a mission trip or through the Peace Corps. Both require you to stay and serve a community for a period of time ranging from weeks to a few years with the Peace Corps. Either option can be extremely rewarding for those who choose these options.

If you are planning to stay in the U.S., there are similar ways to serve through AmeriCorps programs or through fellowships that target underserved communities.

Another admirable option is serving in the armed forces. The military is always looking for new recruits and those with a college education become instantly valuable, given chances to rise up in the ranks faster than those who immediately enlist out of school. Talk with a recruiter if this is something that interests you.

Three Tips for Picking the Right Graduate Program

During your undergraduate studies, you are given time and space to determine what career path is right for you. One in three students will change their major during their time in college! While that is okay for a bachelor’s degree, you don’t have that same leniency with graduate programs. Graduate programs provide a lot of value and are required in many career fields. It is important that you find one that is worth your time and money. Here are three things to consider when making that decision.

1. Consider your desired career path and goals.

Woman looking out of an open window in front of her computer, pondering the paths she could take in life.There are many benefits to advanced degrees. Increased earnings, switching careers, and even personal goals can be a part of the decision to pursue a master’s degree or higher. To truly make the smartest choice you should factor in everything that you can. The primary benefit of a graduate education is very specialized knowledge that can benefit you or your career path. This can be as simple as a school principal versus elementary teacher. It can also be very specific like choosing a course that uses a unique coding program for one sole purpose. Take inventory of what your goals and needs are, then look at what various schools can provide you. Course listings are provided that give a synopsis of each course offered.

2. Fit your lifestyle.

Enrolling in an undergraduate program should be about the skills you will learn and the value you will receive from your education. Your graduate program doesn’t have to win you over with a nice gym or club sports, the program is the selling point. Therefore it is best to find what works the best for you and your profession. Location is a very important first factor to determine. Some programs are only offered in specific regions, like marine biology on the coasts. However, if your program can be more universal then you should focus on what makes the most sense. If a middle school in Springfield accepts teachers from Missouri State or Drury then you don’t necessarily need to go to Harvard or Yale for grad school.A black woman leading a business meeting and pointing at an easel of paper.

You should determine how your current schedule can accommodate the courses you’ll need to graduate, as well as your schedule. Many people begin graduate programs after having a full time job so they have to build their graduate class schedule around the demands of a job. This can mean taking courses solely online versus going to some in person throughout the week. The important thing to remember is to do what works for you and your schedule.

3. Build a long-term plan.

There are far more circumstances that you have to account for when planning your graduate education. Many people pursue this degree while working in their career field, so there is only a finite amount of time available. A black man mapping out something on sticky notes on a window. Additionally, while scholarships and grants for pursuing a graduate degree are available, there aren’t many of them, so financial decisions should be part of the process.

Before pursuing a grad program consider what is needed and at what timeframe. If you are looking for very specific instruction, make that a priority. If you are just getting the program but have no pressing need, then build your schedule that can maximize your ability to achieve and is the most financially advantageous.

Seven Advantages to Building Credit Before Graduating

Credit and how to manage it is an important subject that is often neglected in high schools and even colleges, unless it’s a part of your degree field. However, it is something that everyone should at least have some knowledge about. Whether you are purchasing a car or renting/buying a house, your credit score is used for a long list of large purchases along with smaller, everyday items as well. We have put together a short list of things to keep in mind, along with tips, to make sure you understand the world of credit.

What is a Credit Score?

A credit score tells banks and lenders how likely you are to pay your loan back in a timely manner. It is based on your credit history which is a record of how much you have borrowed and paid back. Late payments decrease your score, while consistent, on-time payments will gradually increase your score.

What makes a Credit Score Good or Bad?

Credit scores are typically rated on a scale from 300-850, with a higher score meaning better credit. According to Experian, a credit reporting agency, 700 or above is considered good, while above 800 is excellent. The average credit scores fall in the 600-750 range. However, don’t be discouraged if your score is low, as there are many ways to raise it. These include making payments on time, cutting back on credit card spending, paying off debt, along with more ways that can be found with a quick internet search.

An infographic showing 7
Click on the image for a full size of this infographic

Keep these seven things in mind as you consider credit cards and building your credit:

1. Getting a credit card can teach good credit habits.

When getting a brand-new credit card, it can be tempting to spend money right away on non-essential items. Always set yourself a budget and never purchase anything that you couldn’t afford using your debit card. A good trick can be to put your groceries that you would normally buy on a debit card, on your credit card and pay it off immediately. This will slowly but surely begin to build your credit and help your credit score rise. Handled carefully, making smart choices, a credit card is an excellent way to build credit.

2. Cardholder perks

Every credit card comes with its own set of perks. Even cards from the same company have different rewards. Some cards provide airline miles, while others provide cash back. These are just two of the rewards credit cards can give you but there are a lot more out there. Student cards may come with a lower credit limit but can give the cardholder access to things like scholarships, 0% APR for the first year, and discounts on school supplies.

3. Receive lower rates on loans

Buying a car, a house, or any other large item is something that will more than likely require a loan from a bank. Many get the amount they apply for but the interest rates on these loans vary, and they can make a world of difference. Having a higher credit score is the biggest thing lenders use to determine the interest rates on these loans. Banks will see that you have a high score, meaning you are someone who doesn’t miss payments often and can be trusted to pay off the loan they are giving you. It can add up to a lot of saved money! Be careful, however, borrowing too much money or late payments will knock your credit score down. 

4. Makes for a more appealing tenant

When attempting to rent a home, you will most likely have to submit your social security number so the landlord can see your credit score. You are much more likely to get approved or possibly chosen over other applicants if you have a higher credit score. This ties back to the loan section. The landlord will see that you have a high score and be more trusting of you to pay your rent on time and in full.

5. An increased credit limit on cards

The higher your credit score, the more willing a credit card company will be to give you a higher spending limit on your credit card. This can be nice for attempting to build your score higher or maybe covering you in an emergency situation you hadn’t saved up for. Maybe it’s an unforeseen health issue or car problems on a long road trip, a credit card can bring a sense of comfort knowing you have access to these funds in case a situation similar to these arises.

6. Save money on security deposits

Often, companies will charge a service fee when establishing utilities such as water, electric, or gas in your name for the first time or when moving to a new location. Having a good credit score can sometimes wipe these fees away completely!

7. Sense of achievement!

Having a good credit score is something to be proud of! Especially at a younger age. It is difficult to keep up on all of your payments, and adding another to the mix can be stressful and complicate things. If you are able to build your credit, that’s a big accomplishment. It shows that you have created a responsible spending plan and you have developed good credit habits. These are tools you will carry with you for life and will continue to be helpful as you progress into buying a home or whatever your next step may be.

Learn more and manage your credit score at AnnualCreditReport.com.

Three Major Steps after Decision Day

Hey Seniors! Congratulations on a job well done!

It’s time to celebrate — and then think about what’s next! Don’t lose focus, there are a few major steps you need to accomplish before you’re ready to attend college this fall. For those who have not made a decision yet, there is still time!

Most schools, especially community colleges, have a rolling admissions policy. This means that they are constantly accepting students up to the beginning of classes in August. Here is some information that will be helpful:

1. Finalize all scholarships / financial aid

Two people staring at the screen of a laptop.

There are different ways to pay for school and most students have multiple sources to do so. Make sure your college has all your information so you are all set for the beginning of your semester, especially if you plan to take summer courses. Each student will be sent a document that considers all forms of your financial aid, including grants and loans from filing the FAFSA, institutional  scholarships, and private scholarships you have applied for separately. By confirming with the financial aid office at your chosen college, you will be able to confirm what your true total for school is. If you have questions don’t be afraid to ask your financial aid experts on campus!

For students who still haven’t decided, there is still time. The most important thing for you to do is file the FAFSA. Every year there are billions of dollars that go unclaimed by students that could earn financial aid but missed out because they did not file the FAFSA. If you have not applied to schools there is a chance you will still qualify for automatic scholarships they provide for academics. If there is a school you are interest in, reach out to their admissions office and they will fill you in on the steps you need to take. Find free help completing your FAFSA this summer at one of several events throughout Missouri.

2. Register for your Orientation

Students Walking down a Campus Hallway

After graduation, your college orientation will be the biggest day before you begin classes. You and thousands of fellow 

students will flood campus during the summer to get your plans finalized. Most orientations include meeting faculty in your major, setting up your course schedule, and confirming your housing. Orientation day offers you a chance to meet fellow freshmen for the first time and it is designed to be fun! Make sure you check out your school’s website and select an orientation date that works for you and your parents.

If you are still not decided, use this time to go on a college visit. A lot can change between the start and end of your senior year, so going to a campus with new perspective is vital.

3. Celebrate your Success!

A group of graduates celebrating their success.

The final months of senior year were like a whirlwind with spring sports ending, taking finals, and graduating. Take time to celebrate yourself! You are about to take part in one of the biggest changes of your life. That is something to be excited about. The more you can appreciate what it took to get to campus, the more invested you will be in your success while there.

For those who haven’t decided yet, don’t get down on yourself! All paths are not the same. In fact, most people go through ups and downs including changing majors or even schools. Remember that you have accomplished just as much by graduating high school and that your future is bright! Do not be afraid to ask for help while figuring out what’s next.